Disgraced Governor Asa Hutchinson Runs to NYT For Cover After Being Called Out For Supporting Chemical Castration of Kids
April 8, 2021 (1mo ago)

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After vetoing a bill that would protect Arkansas children from the threat of being chemically castrated by ghoulish “mad scientist” doctors, Arkansas Governor and Bush Republican Asa Hutchinson ran to the New York Times to squeal on his fellow conservatives.

Here’s how the New York Times characterized their exclusive interview with Hutchinson:

The state’s Republican governor, who recently vetoed an anti-transgender bill only to be overridden by the legislature, spoke to The Times about why his party has “got to show greater compassion.”

Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, opposed the bill, after supporting other laws limiting transgender rights. He has been making the case that the legislation not only violates conservative principles but could also hurt Republicans politically.

We spoke to the governor about the new law, his belief that Republicans are too enmeshed in the culture wars and whether the party has strayed from fundamental conservative values. The interview has been lightly edited. [New York Times]

Here are some choice excerpts of what Hutchinson said to the Times:

But when I saw this third bill come forward, I thought it went too far. And I said: “We’ve got to show greater tolerance. We’ve got to show greater compassion.” And so I didn’t sign that.

[W]hen you look at conservatism, historically, you’ve had the Ronald Reagan coalition of defense conservatives, economic conservatives and social conservatives, and all three of those have formed the base of the Republican Party. There’s some tension between the different elements of that base. And we’ve been able to manage that very well over the course of the last four decades.

But you see, today the cultural war part of conservatism has overshadowed in many instances, and we haven’t struck the right balance with the economic conservatism and the restraint of government.

[W]hat’s important here, the risk for the party, is that particularly millennials, young people, they want to see more tolerance. They do not believe in judging someone else and making laws that make their lives more difficult. And so while the transgender community is very small, there’s a larger group that does not like the government picking on them. And that’s where we lose in the broader population — reflecting intolerance and reflecting a lack of diversity. [NYT]

If you’re going to be a broad-based party, you have to be true to your principles. And it starts with a restraint on government action.

Absolutely disgraceful. Governor Asa Hutchinson has completely undermined conservatives and common-sense Americans everywhere by agreeing to an interview with the fake New York Times to help them set their radical, anti-child, anti-morality transsexual agenda.

Hutchinson lamely appeals to the conservative principle of “limited government” as his rationale for defending the chemical castration of children.

The bill is overbroad, it’s extreme and, very importantly, it does not grandfather in those young people who are currently under hormone treatment, which means that those in Arkansas who are undergoing, under the doctor’s care and parents’ care, hormonal treatment — that would be withdrawn in the middle of that.

But you see, today the cultural war part of conservatism has overshadowed in many instances, and we haven’t struck the right balance with the economic conservatism and the restraint of government.

And that’s how I’ve made the case on this issue, is that as we do this analysis and as we support our social conservatives and we fight for these issues, we still have to ask the question, is this a proper role of government? Is this something that should be managed through families and churches and where they impact the culture or are we going to fight every battle by the state trying to change the culture or preserve the culture?

That’s a question we’re not asking enough. And that’s where I’d like to see a greater level of debate, a greater level of restraint, and not just simply saying we can solve every problem in society by passing a law. That’s not conservatism. I want us to refocus on that. [NYT]

See also Hutchinson’s recent interview on ABC News for more of his mewling rhetoric about limited government.

“We’ve veered from our intellectual concepts of a limited role of government,” he said. “We have moved more toward the cultural, social conservative side and we have veered from that balance of a limited role in government, so we need leaders that will step up and say ‘let’s think this through and let’s, let’s lead and let’s not just simply play to those that want to engage in every cultural battle.'” [ABC News]

One wonders what kind of measures Hutchinson will endorse next in his pursuit of “limited government.” Perhaps he will seek to legalize 12-year-olds having sex with grown men? Perhaps he will push to legalize drug dealers selling fentanyl to 10-year-olds? Maybe the state of Arkansas should allow 14-year-olds to skip school, buy alcohol, and drive around drunk? After all, according to Hutchinson, the state cannot just “solve every problem in society by passing a law.”

Say, when’s the last time an establishment Republican told you that we ought to limit government by ending the War in Afghanistan?

A closer read of Hutchinson’s Times interview suggests that Hutchinson’s supposed principled stand is anything but. He gives away the game in this passage, republished from above:

[W]hat’s important here, the risk for the party, is that particularly millennials, young people, they want to see more tolerance. They do not believe in judging someone else and making laws that make their lives more difficult. And so while the transgender community is very small, there’s a larger group that does not like the government picking on them. And that’s where we lose in the broader population — reflecting intolerance and reflecting a lack of diversity.

If you’re going to be a broad-based party, you have to be true to your principles. And it starts with a restraint on government action. [NYT]

In other words, Hutchinson is attempting to appear “hip” to the kids by “getting down” with child transsexuals.

Of course, this not the first time a Republican has betrayed his base and gone “woke.” Historically, establishment Republicans will happily take every chance they can get to virtue signal to the “woke” mainstream media. The late John McCain comes to mind. McCain certainly loved seeing his name mentioned favorably in the New York Times or the Washington Post.

The weak and pathetic Hutchinson’s desperate attempt to appeal to the woke left’s radical transsexual agenda certainly won’t win him any new supporters on the radical left. The New York Times all but implied that he is a dreaded transphobe in one of their questions.

Last month, you signed bills barring trans women and girls from participating in sports competitions consistent with their gender identity and allowing doctors to refuse to treat trans patients because of religious or moral objections. Why is this legislation different for you? [NYT]

In other questions, the New York Times blatantly implied that Americans who wish to protect children from the latest medical fad sweeping the nation are a bunch of Neanderthal doofuses.

So aren’t all three of these bills laws in search of a problem? Is Arkansas really awash in complaints about the rights of trans people?

And as you’re alluding to, this whole issue has become a bit of a circus. Why do you think so many conservatives feel the need to interfere in the private medical decisions of trans people and their families? What do you think is driving this? [NYT]

Thankfully, the good legislators of Arkansas overrode Hutchinson’s veto.

Members of the Arkansas General Assembly voted 96-32 Tuesday to override Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s veto of House Bill 1570, which would prohibit doctors in Arkansas from administering gender-affirming medical care to transgender minors.

Overriding a veto in Arkansas requires a simple majority in both houses of the legislature. Legislators in the House voted for the override 71-24, and in the Senate 25-8. [Arkansas Traveler]

The children of Arkansas will be protected from chemical castration by the Dr. Jekylls of the world for the time being.

Unfortunately for Hutchinson, it appears that he may have castrated his own political future. President Trump asserted as much in a hilarious statement to the national media.

“Asa Hutchinson, the lightweight RINO Governor of Arkansas, just vetoed a Bill that banned the CHEMICAL CASTRATION OF CHILDREN,” Trump said in a statement to reporters. “‘Bye-bye Asa,’ that’s the end of him! Fortunately for the Great State of Arkansas, Sarah Huckabee Sanders will do a fantastic job as your next Governor!” [Newsweek]

But that may be besides the point. Hutchinson will be term-limited out of the role of governor in 2022, which suggests that he may have had other motivations to grandstand for the national media at the expense of conservatives who wish to protect vulnerable children.

After he leaves office, look for Governor Hutchinson to land a cushy sinecure in corporate America, or somewhere in the Republican establishment world of nonprofits and foundations, as a reward for his obedience to the national media agenda.

Just another day in the Globalist American Empire.

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